Now that Thailand’s Internet ‘Great Firewall’ is being erected and we are reduced to a single international gateway to the rest of the world for purposes of surveillance, there’s only one solution to your privacy: Virtual Private Networks.

There has been some talk that VPNs may be made illegal in Thailand. Govts have shot themselves in the foot before but this is unlikely to happen because all corporations use VPN to communicate with their head offices to protect trade secrets.

To put this in perspective, Thailand currently has 10 international Internet gateways, bearing bandwidth of 1,954 Gb/sec.

With so many VPNs to choose from, it’s hard to make a decision for the right provider for you. Two of those crucial decisions are choosing a VPN which maintains no logs of your activity and one which you are able to pay anonymously.

PIA logo

TorrentFreak uses the Private Internet Access and FACT has been testing PIA for some months with great success. It’s possible to use PIA as an ‘always-on’ solution so you can just set it up and forget about it.

FACT needs to caution ANYBODY who uses VPN. “Loose lips sink ships!” Using a VPN is no excuse for using speech you might not use in public. No VPN is a “get out of jail free” card!

FACTsite has never succumbed to the gilded lure of advertising but, in today’s political climate, we think Private Internet Access is one of your very best choices. Don’t fancy decades in prison for your Facebook posts?

PIA supports OpenVPN, PPTP and IPSEC/L2TP multi-gigabit VPN tunnels. PIA has 2,906 servers in 31 locations in 20 countries on every continent for you to choose, meaning you can access content which is copyrighted in your choice of country, such as streaming TV or movies.

PIA’s IP cloak masks your real IP address with one of our anonymous IP addresses, effectively keeping websites and internet services from tracking your webbrowsing habits, monitoring what you search for, and discovering your geographic location.

Here’s how VPNs work:



Private Internet Access works on all your devices on every platform so you can take your VPN everywhere with you. Better still, each PIA account can be used on five different devices so you can carry your privacy wherever you are: home, office, mobile. Use a Windows PC at work, carry a MacBook Pro (OS X), play with Linux at home, use an iPad (iOS), and have a Galaxy (Android) in your pocket? PIA has you covered!

For a one-year subscription, PIA costs THB 121 (USD $3.33) a month. Surely your freedom deserves this.

Protect yourself today! Private Internet Access.

MICT-Just a moment

Out of the night that covers me,

Black as the pit from pole to pole,

I thank whatever gods may be

For my unconquerable soul.

In the fell clutch of circumstance

I have not winced nor cried aloud.

Under the bludgeonings of chance

My head is bloody, but unbowed.

Beyond this place of wrath and tears

Looms but the Horror of the shade,

And yet the menace of the years

Finds and shall find me unafraid.

It matters not how strait the gate,

How charged with punishments the scroll,

I am the master of my fate,

I am the captain of my soul.


“Invictus”, 2558

Silent nights…

December 22, 2014

FullSizeRender-4Free Speech Xmas card

[Graduate School of Journalism, University of California at Berkeley]

November 7, 2013

Day Sixteen: Free speech on trial in Thailand




 Dear Friends,

I would like to update you about my case. After the verdict came out in the First Instance Court. Both prosecutor and I did the appeal and tomorrow, 9.30 am (Friday, 8 November) the appeal verdict will be read at the Criminal Court, room no. 711.

You can read case detail and background from the following link.

I have to apologize for shortly notice.


Chiranuch (Jiew)


Chiranuch’s appeal against her guilty verdict will be heard on Friday, February 8th, at Bangkok’s Criminal Court (San Aya), on Ratchadapisek Road opposite Soi 38, Lat Phrao MTR station. Chiranuch’s trial is in Courtroom 711.





2012 in review

January 1, 2013

The stats helper monkeys prepared a 2012 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

19,000 people fit into the new Barclays Center to see Jay-Z perform. This blog was viewed about 160,000 times in 2012. If it were a concert at the Barclays Center, it would take about 8 sold-out performances for that many people to see it.

Click here to see the complete report.

Somyot Prueksakasemsuk, editor and labor rights advocate, has been held without bail since his arrest April 30, 2011. Somyot’s next court appearance will be on December 19, 2012; the court is expected to announce Somyot’s verdict so your support is most important. We welcome all observers.

Briefing Note_SomyotPrueksakasemsuk 15102012


Based on discussion with Somyot’s defence team, it has proven a deterrent to legal excesses and improper judicial practice for individuals and organizations attending to send an official letter to Thawee Prachuaplarb, Director-General of Criminal Court Judges, notifying the Court of your participation requesting. It would be helpful if your letter, if in English, should be accompanied by a copy of a Thai translation, if possible. The letter should be addressed to Criminal Court Building, Rachadapisek Road, Jompon District, Chatuchak Sub-district, Bangkok 10900 (Calling/Faxing in Thailand: Tel. 02-541-2284-90, Fax 02-541-2142 and 02-541-2141, Calling/Faxing outside Thailand: Tel. (662) 541 – 2284 to 2290, Fax (662) 541 – 2142, 541 – 2141) (in Thai: นายทวี ประจวบลาภ อธิบดีผูพิพากษาศาลอาญา อาคารศาลอาญา ถนนรัชดาภิเษก แขงวงจอมพล เขต จตุจักร กรุงเทพฯ 10900).

Your letter should address the concerns of freedom of expression and fair trial in international communities. The letter should not address directly that you are concerned with the lack of impartiality in the Thai court as this could forbid you from participating in the trial observation, as the court is extremely sensitive on criticism.

Next week, the Criminal Court will resume its schedule on Somyot’s case on 19 December 2012 after it has been delayed for three months without informed explanation. Prior to this, the Constitutional Court also ruled that Article 112 is not against the constitutionality. Both information made the lawyer as well as the family grave concerns about the negative development of the case. According to the lawyer, if the Criminal Court decided on penalty, Somyot may face a sentence of maximum 10-year imprisonment.

While there are neither confirmation nor details about the next court schedule informed by writing, fear of prolonged detention as well as sudden verdict announcement has been worsen among family members.

In this regard, the 112 Family Network would like to draw your attention as well as ask for your participation on the trial observation on 19 December 2012. Due to experience of other freedom of expression cases, we learnt that both Thai and international observers play a very important role to ensure fair trials.

Somyot’s verdict is held Wednesday, December 19, at Bangkok’s Criminal Court (San Aya), on Ratchadapisek Road opposite Soi 32, Lat Phrao MTR station at 9am. 

Volunteer interpretation is provided upon request:



Thank you so much. We’ll see you in court.


Best Regards,


[CJ Hinke of FACT comments: We have all been wildly conditioned to live in fear of criminals and subversives and radicals. That fear prevents us from seeing the bigger picture. The gaoling of one man or woman rips apart marriages, families and communities and no good at all for the wider society. On the eve of Somyot’s verdict, we ask you to put yourself in wiofe Sukunya’s or son Panitan’s shoes.]

Political Prisoners in Thailand: October 29, 2012




Sukunya Prueksakasemsuk, wife of lese majeste political prisoner Somyos, has released a letter she has written to her husband. There are versions available in English and in ไทย. Despite Sukunya’s tireless efforts on behalf of her husband, Somyos remains imprisoned. Her letter is released to coincide with the 18-month anniversary of her husband’s imprisonment.

Somyos has been imprisoned for this very lengthy period but has still not had a verdict delivered. As PPT recently noted, the UN’s Working Group on Arbitrary Detention has issued an Opinion, stating that:

The deprivation of liberty of Mr Prueksakasemsuk, being in contravention of Articles 19 of the UDHR [Universal Declaration of Human Rights] and 19 (2) of the ICCPR [International Covenant of Civil and Political Rights], is arbitrary, and falls in categories II of the categories applicable to the cases submitted to the Working Group.

As a result of the Opinion rendered, the Working Group requests the Government to take the necessary steps to remedy the situation of Mr Prueksaksemsuk and bring it into conformity with the standards and principles set forth in the ICCPR.

The Working Group believes that, taking into account all circumstances of the case, the adequate remedy would be to release Mr Prueksakasemsuk and accord him and enforceable right to compensation pursuant to Article 9(5) of the ICCPR.


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