Falangism-Wikipedia

February 12, 2012

[FACT comments: We have been hearing the hyper-Royalist political parties referred to as “falangists”. We thought FACT readers would be interested in knowing the historical roots of the Spanish Falange through these excerpts from Wikipedia. We have interpolated similarities to Thailand’s current politics in brackets.]

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Falangism

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Falange

 

El yugo y las flechas The Yoke and Arrows

 

Excerpts: 

Falangism (Spanish: Falangismo) is the political ideology of the Spanish Falange as well as derivatives of it in other countries. In its original form, Falangism is widely associated as a fascist ideology…In its original form, it claimed to be more radical than fascism… The word Falange in Spanish refers to a Phalanx formation or front a political metaphor commonly adopted by modern radicalized movements in the early-to-middle 20th century such as: Popular front, National Front or Vanguard.

Members of the party were called Bukaneros (Spanish: Falangistas). The Falange also developed youth organizations, with members known as Flechas [arrows] and Pelayos [nationalists]. Since 1975, Falangists have split into several different political movements that have continued into the 21st century. The main political movement that retained its Falangist heritage and is the continuation of the party is the Falange Española Tradicionalista y de las Juntas de Ofensiva Nacional-Sindicalista, or “Spanish Traditionalist Phalanx of the Assemblies of National-Syndicalist Offensive” (FET y de las JONS). Chief among these are the Falange Española de las JONS (which takes its name from the historical party), Falange Auténtica, Falange Española Independiente (which later merged with the FE de las JONS), and FE – La Falange.

In 2009, police arrested five members of a Falangist splinter group calling itself Falange y Tradición. They alleged that this group which was unknown to mainstream Falangist groups, had been involved in a raft of violent attacks in the Navarre region. These attacks were primarily targeted at Basque separatist terrorist group ETA and at ETA sympathisers.[21] [FACT: In Thailand such racism has been directed against tribal refugees such as the Hmong from Laos and Burmese Karen as well as Rohingya from Bangladesh, among others. However, the most egregious examples of overt racism has been used against other Thais, Southern Muslims.]

Falangism places a strong emphasis on Catholic [FACT: in Thailand, read Buddhist] religious identity… Falangism emphasized the need for authority, hierarchy, and order in society.[5] [FACT: In Thailand, read this as monarchy and the monied elite.] Falangism was originally similar to Italian fascism in certain respects. It shared its contempt for Bolshevism and other forms of socialism and a distaste for democracy. [FACT: Sound familiar, Thailand?]

Spanish Falangism in the Falange’s original manifesto called the Twenty-Seven Points declared Falangism to support: the unity of Spain and the elimination of regional separatism [FACT: Patani]; the establishment of a dictatorship led by the Falange [FACT: Royalists]; utilizing violence to regenerate Spain [FACT: Police and military impunity as well as vigilante actions.]; promoting the development of Spanish imperial power [FACT: Thai elites think Thailand is special and unique and need not concern itself with the opinions of foreigners]; a social revolution to create: a national syndicalist economy that creates national syndicates of both employees and employers to mutually organize and control the economic activity, agrarian reform, industrial expansion, respect for private property with the exception of nationalizing credit facilities to prevent capitalist usury.[7] It supports criminalization of strikes by employees and lockouts by employers as illegal acts.[8] Falangism supports the state to have jurisdiction of setting wages.[9] Under Franco, the Falange abandoned its original anti-capitalist tendencies, declaring the ideology to be fully compatible with capitalism.[10]

Falangism supports a national, trans-class society while opposing individual-class-based societies, such as bourgeois or proletarian societies. Falangism opposes class conflict, Primo de Rivera declared that “The State is founded on two principles—service to the united nation and the cooperation of classes“.[14]

Falange’s original manifesto, the Twenty-Seven Points called for a social revolution to create: a national syndicalist economy that creates national syndicates of both employees and employers to mutually organize and control the economic activity, agrarian reform, industrial expansion, respect for private property with the exception of nationalizing credit facilities to prevent capitalist usury.[22] Under Franco, the Falange abandoned its original anti-capitalist tendencies, declaring the ideology to be fully compatible with capitalism.[23]

Political system

Falangism supports the establishment of a Falangist-led totalitarian single party state. [FACT: Lots of parties but all support the same ends.]

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